Monthly Archives: March 2018

Thinking Possibilities.

CUE18

Thinking Possibilities.

I have to think possibilities. That’s what I do. That’s what I’ve always done.

This past October, at our regional CUE Techtober ’17, I won the raffle for free registration to the CUE conference in Palm Springs. Needless to say, I jumped up and down and shared my blessing with everyone on all of my social media sites. I was thinking possibilities.

Thursday, 4:30 a.m., I was already awake; I wanted to be on the road by 5 a.m. for the 3 hour drive to the Palm Springs Convention Center. I love driving, so I didn’t find the distance daunting; as long as the French Roast in my tumbler stays hot and my little Kia Soul keeps moving and the iPod is charged, I’m good. As I drove through the darkness, I wondered if I’d find anyone I know, wondered which sessions I should attend, and wondered if I’d make any new connections — thinking possibilities. The rain pounded as I entered San Bernardino, and as the sun rose directly in front of me, I glimpsed an incredibly vivid rainbow in my side mirror — couldn’t help but think possibilities.

I arrived by 8 a.m., just as I’d hoped, picked up my badge, grabbed a venue map, and headed toward the first session (yes, I did miss the keynote, regrettably, but hey, I did well to get up at 4:30 — to make the keynote, well, I couldn’t commit to getting up that early). Thursday’s sessions began with “Project-Based-Learning” and ended with “Future Ready Research.” Full day. Exhausted … but thinking possibilities.

Each session I attended throughout the conference turned out to be energizing. Honestly, I didn’t hit a “bad one” in the bunch. I consume conference offerings like I’m at an all-you-can-eat buffet; I took no breaks! And I checked out all of the resources that presenters so willingly shared on the CUE site! Today, I used Actively Learn and Formative as I planned the week’s 7th and 8th grade English classes, respectively. I’m eager to try out Flipgrid as I look for ways to increase the “volume” of my students’ voices. I hope to integrate some new research ideas and design thinking tools, as I collaborate with my friend and 7th grade English teacher, Janelle (I couldn’t help but text her a couple of discoveries from my sessions as I sat in my hotel room, Thursday night). I’m thinking possibilities.

cue1

Highlights also included checking out the exhibitors and meeting one of the hip-hop artists from Flocabulary. Yes, I love hip-hop — I probably enjoy Flocabulary videos as much as or even more than my middles. I sing and dance as the class watches, so when I met Chris Payne (he’s the driver in the animated car in the video on text structures, by the way), I had to get a photo with him to show my students on Monday! Maybe if the teaching-thing doesn’t work out, my husband will agree to move to New York so that I can hip-hop with Flocabulary’s team.

Which leads to why I’m thinking possibilities.

I’m moving out of my current teaching position at the end of this year for a variety of reasons. I do so with much gratefulness for my colleagues, the administrators who hired me, and the kids with whom I shared my days.

It may seem strange, then, that without a teaching position for the next year yet, I spent 3 days at the CUE Conference. When a month ago, I realized that I would not have a teaching position lined up, I wondered if I should still attend the conference. I’m so glad that I didn’t let my unknown future deter me from participating in this energizing gathering of innovators, collaborators, and genuine lovers of all things kids.

I must say thank you to my Twitter PLN, CUE, and to CUE Director, Jon Corippo, for their personal encouragement this past summer when I dove into Twitter and wanted to try everything I heard about, right away. They think possibilities, and because of them, I’m still

Thinking Possibilities!

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under CUE, Passion and Purpose, Reflective Practice

Style or Skill?

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-HMr_7kz7b6Q/T-OhMergQKI/AAAAAAAAAg0/yPnIOT_J2HY/s640/Slide1.JPG

 

We’ve all seen this saying and know it’s true. I’ve been wondering today how it might be adapted to teachers:

Teachers teach, just not on the same day, or in the same way. 

Teaching is part technique, part artistry, and part personality. Just as students bring their various selves into the classroom and learn differently, so do teachers bring their various selves into a school and teach differently. And that’s okay. 

The problem is how do administrators assess “good teaching” when styles and skills can look so different depending on the individual teacher’s technique, artistry, and personality? 

If, for example, student engagement is measured by raised hands, that’s fine in the classroom full of compliant students taught by a teacher who likes a quiet, controlled environment. What if, however, the class is taught by a teacher who loves the spontaneous responses of kids eager to share? As the kids raise their hands, they also call out their responses, and the teacher caught up in their enthusiasm quips “You all are talking while raising your hands — I love it!” And she truly does love it because even though they’re raising their hands, their eager responses evidence engagement. 

Or what if in that same class, a number of kids don’t raise their hands, nor do they speak. Is this to be considered a lack of engagement? Possibly. Possibly not. What about Ethan who just doesn’t talk in class? He’s an introvert. He’s engaged and his writing will later demonstrate his thoughtful attention during the class. But his hand isn’t raised. 

How can administrators fairly evaluate “good teaching” based on student engagement and teacher response, given the number of variables involved in a dynamic classroom environment? I don’t have an answer.

I do know that I realized today that I love what I do because of my style, because of my artistry when creating learning experiences, and especially because of my unique and personal interaction with these kids I love.

And so I teach, just not in the same way every day.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Passion and Purpose, Reflective Practice